Update: Mother’s Act Killed by Senate

Mon, 28 Jul 2008 14:37

Senate kills massive bill to create new programs

The Mother’s Act (a bill that would inevitably land pregnant and new mother’s on psychiatric medications).

WASHINGTON (Associated Press) — The Senate has killed a massive bill to create programs for probing civil rights crimes, combating child pornography and supposedly help new mothers overcome depression. Read the rest of this entry »

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Theory: Mental Health Screening Saves Lives…

In a post on a quickly expanding Yahoo Group named “Atypical_Antipsychotics*” one group member writes:

“According to NAMI*, mental health screening (such as Teen Screen) saves lives by identifying suicidal youths. I have seen no facts or evidence to back this up.

Hmmmmmm………

Here are some facts:

1. Mental health screening leads to labels (one study apparently had an 83% positive rate on the teen screen). (People who are not screened/tested/evaluated are not labeled).

2. Labels often lead to psychiatric drugs. (If you are not labeled you are not drugged. If you are labeled, drugging is not unlikley).

3. Labels can lead to unemployment (discrimination still exists despite the promise of equality promoted in the ADA). Read the rest of this entry »

National Depression Screening on Teens

National Depression Screening Day occurs every October. This day is funded by Screening for Mental Health, Inc. (SMH). In reviewing SMH’s tax returns, which I found online, it is evident that pharmaceutical companies have been funding SMH since 2001. Are these companies being selfless or do they stand to make billions from the screenings?

Their brief adolescent screening test asks questions such as, “In the last four weeks, has there been a time when nothing was fun for you and you just weren’t interested in anything?” “Do you feel that you can’t do anything well or that you are not as good-looking or as smart as most other people?” Do we know of an adolescent that wouldn’t answer yes to at least one of these questions? Read the rest of this entry »